Brook & Tin

Apr 04

fourstorylimit:

These Are The Prices AT&T, Verizon and Sprint Charge For Cellphone Wiretaps
Holy fucking shit. They have made a business out of wiretapping cellphones. This reads like an a la carte menu.
Wiretaps cost hundreds of dollars per target every month, generally paid at daily or monthly rates. To wiretap a customer’s phone, T-Mobile charges law enforcement a flat fee of $500 per target. Sprint’s wireless carrier Sprint Nextel requires police pay $400 per “market area” and per “technology” as well as a $10 per day fee, capped at $2,000. AT&T charges a $325 activation fee, plus $5 per day for data and $10 for audio. Verizon charges a $50 administrative fee plus $700 per month, per target.
Data requests for voicemail or text messages cost extra.AT&T demands $150 for access to a target’s voicemail, while Verizon charges $50 for access to text messages. Sprint offers the most detailed breakdown of fees for various kinds of data on a phone, asking $120 for pictures or video, $60 for email, $60 for voice mail and $30 for text messages.
And then they try and pass that off as COGS recovery? 

“Fees are charged to law enforcement in other circumstances such as court ordered requests and it’s important to note that any fee charged is for recovery of cost required to support these law enforcement requests 24/7,” she writes.

I’m not buying that. That’s way to low of a price, and way to cleanly packaged. If these companies cared about their consumer and their privacy, they would be making it painful  and confusing to get access. They wouldn’t have a clean price structure. These companies want the government business. 

fourstorylimit:

These Are The Prices AT&T, Verizon and Sprint Charge For Cellphone Wiretaps

Holy fucking shit. They have made a business out of wiretapping cellphones. This reads like an a la carte menu.

And then they try and pass that off as COGS recovery? 

“Fees are charged to law enforcement in other circumstances such as court ordered requests and it’s important to note that any fee charged is for recovery of cost required to support these law enforcement requests 24/7,” she writes.

I’m not buying that. That’s way to low of a price, and way to cleanly packaged. If these companies cared about their consumer and their privacy, they would be making it painful  and confusing to get access. They wouldn’t have a clean price structure. These companies want the government business. 

(via soupsoup)

Mar 26

[video]

Mar 22

Mar 21

theatlantic:

sunfoundation:

Redefining NBA Basketball Positions

For the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference a few weeks ago, Stanford biomechanical engineering student Muthu Alagappan presented his work on redefining basketball positions.


Fascinating!

theatlantic:

sunfoundation:

Redefining NBA Basketball Positions

For the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference a few weeks ago, Stanford biomechanical engineering student Muthu Alagappan presented his work on redefining basketball positions.

Fascinating!

courtenaybird:

The time spent on social networks 

courtenaybird:

The time spent on social networks 

(via emergentfutures)

Mar 19

emergentfutures:

Does social media affect how you spend money? You betcha.


“The question isn’t whether social services on the Web influence how we spend money, but rather how they affect your habits. At the end of the day businesses can’t survive without making money, and that’s why we’re seeing a flood of social services that might push you over the ledge to buy that new shiny thing that you probably can’t afford. That’s how they’re going to make money, after all.”

Full Story: TheNextWeb

emergentfutures:

Does social media affect how you spend money? You betcha.

“The question isn’t whether social services on the Web influence how we spend money, but rather how they affect your habits. At the end of the day businesses can’t survive without making money, and that’s why we’re seeing a flood of social services that might push you over the ledge to buy that new shiny thing that you probably can’t afford. That’s how they’re going to make money, after all.”


Full Story: TheNextWeb

Mar 18

parislemon: Power -

parislemon:

My single biggest takeaway from SXSW was all the talk about battery life. Every single person. All the time. People changing plans because they needed to recharge their phones. People walking around with chargers. People who were chargers. Mophies galore. People uninstalling apps that would…

Mar 15

fastcompany:

How One Second Could Cost Amazon $1.6 Billion In Sales 
Research on U.S. Net habits suggests that if this sentence takes longer than a second to load, many citizens will have clicked elsewhere already. If you’ve got the patience (or are European) read on for more shocking data on not dawdling.

fastcompany:

How One Second Could Cost Amazon $1.6 Billion In Sales

Research on U.S. Net habits suggests that if this sentence takes longer than a second to load, many citizens will have clicked elsewhere already. If you’ve got the patience (or are European) read on for more shocking data on not dawdling.

Mar 13

Legal Times: “DOJ Asks Court To Keep Secret Any Partnership Between Google, NSA”

http://legaltimes.typepad.com/blt/2012/03/doj-asks-court-to-keep-secret-any-partnership-between-google-nsa.html

Neither confirm nor deny.

Mar 12

The mystery code at the heart of a potent cyberweapon -

infoneer-pulse:

The mystery behind the Duqu trojan, a supposed follow-up to Stuxnet, has deepened after analysts lifted the lid on a module in its computer code - and found that part of it is written in a strange programming language that they do not recognise. The finding has sparked a fascinating hunt amongst coders and security engineers, who are chipping in ideas as to what the language might be in the comments under this blog post by security analysts Kaspersky.

» via New Scientist